Biochemical Changes Associated With Replacing Sorghum by Cane Molasses in Broiler Chicks

The aim of this study was to investigate effects of substituting sorghum by cane sugar molasses in broiler chicks to act as a source of energy. A control ration containing only sorghum and three other rations containing molasses as 20, 50 and 70% as a substitute of sorghum were formulated for the starter and finisher rations. Those rations were fed to one day-old broiler chicks for a whole period of 8 weeks. Four groups were fed the four rations. Feeding high levels of molasses (50 and 70%) significantly (P < 0.001) degreased food intake, increased in live body weight and dressing percentage then compared with the control group or the group fed diet containing 20% molasses Diarrhoea occurred in the groups fed high levels of molasses did not affect absorption of Zn-65 fed to all groups orally. Also, no significant pathological lesions were detected in the gastrointestinal of chicks fed high levels of molasses (50 and 70%). No significant trend in the increases or decreases Ca, F, Na, Mg, Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn was noticed in the livers, breast and thigh muscles of the four groups. It can be concluded that feeding of molasses to broiler chicks as a substitute of sorghum up to 20% produced the same results as feeding whole sorghum to the chicks.

The aim of this study was to investigate effects of substituting sorghum by cane sugar molasses in broiler chicks to act as a source of energy. A control ration containing only sorghum and three other rations containing molasses as 20, 50 and 70% as a substitute of sorghum were formulated for the starter and finisher rations. Those rations were fed to one day-old broiler chicks for a whole period of 8 weeks. Four groups were fed the four rations. Feeding high levels of molasses (50 and 70%) significantly (P < 0.001) degreased food intake, increased in live body weight and dressing percentage then compared with the control group or the group fed diet containing 20% molasses Diarrhoea occurred in the groups fed high levels of molasses did not affect absorption of Zn-65 fed to all groups orally. Also, no significant pathological lesions were detected in the gastrointestinal of chicks fed high levels of molasses (50 and 70%). No significant trend in the increases or decreases Ca, F, Na, Mg, Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn was noticed in the livers, breast and thigh muscles of the four groups. It can be concluded that feeding of molasses to broiler chicks as a substitute of sorghum up to 20% produced the same results as feeding whole sorghum to the chicks.